Category Archives: Weekend

Director Q and A: Roar Uthaug for THE WAVE

In many respects, Norwegian director Roar Uthaug’s film is a Hollywood disaster movie of the first order: You have your embattled protagonist who sees the danger coming long before anyone else does, but has a hard time getting anyone to believe him; his wonderful family and number of other innocent people put in peril by conservative bureaucrats; an epic environmental disaster – a massive, 80 meter, lake-bound tsunami brought about by the instable mountains of Storfjorden, a tourist destination whose main town, Geirenger, is directly in the path of the water’s fury, brought to convincing life via CGI that threatens to destroy everything in its path; and a harrowing climax that finds our protagonist fighting for the lives of his family members under extreme physical duress.

What sets it apart, however, from such big, desultory over-the-top action spectacles such as San Andreas and 2012, are all the ways it subtly subverts the genre: The hero, played by Kristoffer Joner, is anything but a Rock-like action hero, he looks like the sort of chap who brews his own beer and reads books about physics. His wife (Ane Dahl Torp), is the far more practical, capable one, and whose quick-thinking saves herself and her son after they are trapped in the hotel in which she works.

Like Jaws, a film Uthaug cites as a particular influence, the film is very careful about its slow-building tension. Midway through, you begin to fret about the oncoming danger, wondering just how it will first manifest itself, and when it will make its appearance on the deck of the boat, so to speak. Uthaug spoke to us via phone on the topics of the film’s careful execution, the ways he co-opted the genre, and the very real environmental apocalypse it portrays.

You have said that Jaws was a big influence on your film, and I can especially see that in the way it carefully withholds us from seeing the “monster” for so long.
You kind of get to know the family and the characters and you take your time with that and not just rush into it the destruction of man. We also tried to keep the shore and the mountains there in the background to keep them present throughout to kind of build that tension and that ease of not knowing when it’s going to hit.

It got to the point where the camera would linger on certain shots and I would think ‘Okay, we’re going to start seeing some tremors now’ or ‘We’ll see some rocks falling in the background’ and still nothing was happening. I assume that was entirely by design.
That, and also choosing the locations, and of course how we shot and placed some things.

What’s genuinely spooky about the whole premise is, not only is it not farfetched in the least, there is actually little to no chance of this cataclysmic event NOT happening, right? The film’s impending disaster is entirely factual.
Yeah, everything in the movie, in Geiranger, was based on facts and research from over here. I think here in Norway we create a lot of awareness for situations. And hopefully that will lead to more funding of monitoring these places even better.

I assume the locals who live year-round in Geiranger are well informed of this situation?
They are very aware of that but they also actually feel very safe there because of all the information that is being shared by the geologists monitoring it. They trust those guys and the politicians, and feel safe in that environment. I think also the geologists believe that they won’t ever be in that situation because the place will be evacuated weeks before that will happen, but then, again it’s nature and you never know.

Just out of curiosity, is ten minutes from when the actual mountain crumbles to when the tsunami hits the town a realistic timeline?
Yeah, that’s accurate.

Yikes.
We shot the movie in Geiranger, the actual place that will be hit, and the extras running for their lives up the hill, were all local people living in that area. After the shoot, they came up to me and said they had the time of their lives and thanked us for being able to be a part of it, so hopefully we didn’t give them nightmares.

You mentioned that this is a real place. In Jaws, they had to make up “Amity Island” because, understandably, no real location wanted to be associated with wild shark attacks. Was the town at all concerned about what this film might do to their tourist industry?
We have a lot of tourists going there. There are only about 300 people living there [year-round] but there are almost a million tourists going through there each year. When the news first broke that we were making this movie, there were some [negative] reactions from the local community, local politicians, but as soon as we started talking to them, explaining to them our take on this, I think we won them over to our side. They helped us during production. We arranged a screening of the movie before the nationwide premiere, we had a local screening there for the people who lived there and they enjoyed the movie very much.

To make one more comparison to San Andreas, the leading man is Dwayne Johnson, who is built like a gladiator superhero. Your lead, Kristoffer Joner, by contrast, is remarkably human looking. Even the way he labors when he runs, you can kind of feel the effort. That had to have been by design.
We wanted someone that felt like a real human being. I think Kristoffer is just one of the absolute finest actors here in Norway, so I was very happy he wanted to do this. And we had to put him through a boot camp to train him for mountain climbing. He also trained with a free-diving instructor so he could [stay] under water for a long time. I think his record in the end was three minutes holding his breath.

Some of the stunt work must have been grueling.
Yeah, there were times it was ten hours in and under water. That was a rough time for everyone. I think it shows in the movie the intensity of it. So, I’m very happy we put them through it.

I greatly enjoyed the way you made Idun, his wife, played by Ane Dahl Torp, so capable and strong. Is it fair to say this is something of a feminist action movie?
I’ve always been a fan of strong female characters in all my movies. I think it’s something that I gravitate towards.

She’s so strong, I think Hollywood would be afraid she’d end up eclipsing the male hero.
I guess we are more free in our handling of those kinds of things in Europe, in our most recent cinema, than you are over there. [laughs]

First Look. “Procession: The Art of Norman Lewis” at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

You may be unfamiliar with his journey, let alone the name of artist Norman Lewis. Lewis was an incredible spirit. An African-American man born in New York, fond of world travel, challenged and inspired by learning, teaching, and searching throughout his lifetime and artwork. Lewis specialized in Abstract Expressionism and is recognized for his precise color selection, all the while channeling his life experiences and interactions into various forms — including oil on canvas, crayons on paper, and water colors.

A man of dignity, Lewis expressed his interpretations surrounding morals and values that pertain to humanity and nature. He depicted work that represented the plights of African-Americans in America during the Harlem renaissance and Civil Rights Movement. In addition to his activism, Lewis created poignant works that reflected on his travels through Europe and United States.

Now on display until April 3rd, 2016, PROCESSION: THE ART OF NORMAN LEWIS, opened for viewing at PAFA’s Fisher Brooks Gallery, Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building — just north of City Hall on Broad St.


PAFA is offering FREE museum admission for Procession, every Sunday for the duration of the exhibit.

Hours by day:
Tuesday, Thursday & Friday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m
Wednesday, 10 a.m – 9 p.m
Saturday & Sunday, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m
Closed Mondays and legal holidays


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Curran Lewis, in front of Norman Lewis’ painting, “Title Unknown” (c. 1960), Oil on Canvas.
Photo © Aran Hart

Combined with the paintings, this exhibit displays a unique and touching collection of personal effects, notes, quotes, a video interview, and diverse library that shine light onto the man who devoted his life to his artistic passion and culture. The collection is set up to appreciate thematically rather than chronologically, guiding one through In the City, Visual Sound, Rhythm of Nature, Ritual, Civil Rights, and Summation.


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Norman Lewis (pictured), Photo © Estate of Norman W. Lewis

Lewis was born in Harlem in 1909 and died in Harlem in 1979. During the infancy of Lewis’ professional career, he focused on the “New Negro Movement” as well as African Art. Although he started here, this is not where he would finish. The content of Lewis’ art shifted from African and African-American Art to a more global perception. During the mid 1940s, Lewis altered his subject matter and developed his style. Lewis began his Pure Abstractionism journey that developed to include Naturalist content.

Walking between the rooms and admiring different pieces, we chatted with Philadelphia artist Moe Brooker, who explained that Lewis “kept searching” in an authentic spirit of endless development, “continuing to find inspiration for form and he continues to deal with nature.”


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Artist, Moe Brooker. Standing in front of “Fantasy” (c. 1936), Oil and Ink on Canvas.
Photo © Aran Hart

As he moved forward in his explorations, Lewis was often overlooked and/or discredited because the nature of his work was deemed as both inappropriate and unimaginable for an artist of color. Brooker noted Lewis’ work was debunked in a time when the perception was that “it was not a possibility that one of color could do abstraction”. As is the case with many men and women of color,  Lewis did not receive the accolades he deserved  until over a decade after his death, during the 1990s —  perhaps not even yet today.

Curator Ruth Fine shared that “Norman Lewis is not a very well known painter due to lack of visibility rooting to racism, but also because his was a style that is not readily categorized… and people tend to get to know people that they can put in categories. Lewis is a complicated painter.”


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In the City: Looking at Life. Photo © Aran Hart

To put together Procession, Fine stated she “traveled to various collections over the past few years, and chose those works that would best convey the range of his art and the ideas that permeated the themes that then organized the exhibit.” Fine added she aimed to “give a sense of who the man was as well as the art.” Thus, the exhibition walls and short video tell a story through quotations and conversation that represent Lewis’ philosophy. “Abstraction offers a chance for each person, from a broad range of backgrounds, to bring their own experiences to the paintings… and take away what they want. I think that’s what Lewis wanted.”




Joint contribution from Curran Lewis and Aran Hart.

For more exclusive coverage, ticket giveaways, features, and live updates follow @215mag on twitter, and Instagram.

Featured cover photo: Norman Lewis, “March on Washington” courtesy of PAFA.org


This weekend: CCD Octoberfest at Dilworth Park Saturday and Sunday Oct 24th and 25th

Here ye. Here ye. Come one, come all! This Saturday 10/24 and Sunday 10/25 to Octoberfest at Dilworth Park by City Hall.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS

Free to attend with great live music ALL DAY with 21+ beer garden and other activities (open to all ages). Fun starts at NOON.

See you there!


Presented by Saul Ewing:
This fall festival will fill the park with a series of fun activities & games, plus a social 21+ Saultoberfest Beer Garden by ROSA BLANCA CAFÉ. A variety of vendors, great food and plenty of beer, DJs & live music will spice up this party.



October 24

Noon – MR. SONNY JAMES
Well-known and respected Philly DJ from illVibe Collective, who plays different styles including funk, soul and hip-hop.

1:30 pm – ROSEMARY FIKI
Philadelphia based singer staying true to the soulful musical tradition, captivating audiences far and wide with a trademark sound that is rooted in rock and peppered with alternative, and afrobeat influences.

2:30 pm – ERNEST STUART
Gifted and world-traveled trombonist steeped in the tradition of jazz and Philadelphia soul.
3:30 pm – XANDE CRUZ AND THE BATUKIS BAND
With a sound as rich and diverse as his native São Paulo, XANDE (shun-ji) CRUZ adeptly blends urban and traditional colors and sounds together in a soulful way like none other.
4:30 pm – JUST SOLE: STREET DANCE THEATER
Just Sole: Street Dance Theater uses Street Dance and Theatrical principles as their mediums to inspire, empower, and share their life stories.

5:30 pm – BRIANNA CASH
Singer/Songwriter hailing from North Philadelphia whose beautiful and innovative music is a pure and genuine combination of soul and folk.

6:30 pm – KRISS MINCEY
Alternative RnB artist, Philadelphia New Girl and DMV Native Kriss Mincey beautifully blends her jazz-¬infused style with a touch of contemporary edge.


Games
1-5 pm: Bocce and Corn Hole presented by Major League Bocce will be part of the day’s fun.  Grab your friends and get a social game of bocce and corn hole going while hanging outdoors in the crispness of a fall afternoon.

Kids Corner
There’s something for everyone, even families and kids at Octoberfest at Dilworth Park presented by Saul Ewing.  Throughout the day kids can enjoy –

Noon – 2pm: KYW Newsradio Kidcast gives children a chance to be a KYW news anchor.

Noon – 4pm: Pumpkin Painting presented by Philly Art Center.  Artists will be able to take home their decorated pumpkin.

The Walnut Street Theatre will be on hand to showcase their upcoming shows for adults and children alike.  Stop by their booth and enter to win tickets, and parents be sure to have your camera on hand as kids will be able to get their pictures taken behind a photo board.

Free face painting will also be available.




October 25

Noon – DAVE P (MAKING TIME)
Founder and presenter of Philly’s flavorful Making Time events which have hosted performances featuring different bands from all around the world.

1:30 pm – MYRRIAS
Myrrias patiently build layers of intertwined rhythms and melodies, as each band member complements the group’s high-end shimmer.

2:30 pm – WEEKENDER
Vibrant 5 piece Philly Indie / Dream Pop who have crafted buzzing and dreamy songs served up with spacey, stretched-out vocals between the blissful, fuzzy guitar riffs.

3:30 pm – KATE FAUST
Emerging and aspiring singer-songwriter whose diverse talent displays through her non traditional electro-pop and neo soul music.

4:30 pm – WORK DRUGS
Popular Philly band that successfully blends dance-able percussion rhythms and synths with signature vocal styles, gaining notoriety while touring venues across North America.

Games

Noon-4 pm: Bocce and Corn Hole presented by Major League Bocce will be part of the day’s fun.  Grab your friends and get a social game of bocce and corn hole going while hanging outdoors in the crispness of a fall afternoon.

 

This Friday!!! Mural Arts Philly DJ Mural Block Party Redux 6-10pm | 13th St between Sansom/Walnut Sts.

Last fall, you helped Mural Arts kick off the Philly DJ Mural Project, a program that put a creative spin on music education for youth. Now join us for our big return to Midtown Village and celebrate Shepard Fairey’s new mural, honoring Philly’s rich DJ history, all while dancing for hours to jams from your all-time faves.


Featuring the talents of:
Rich Medina, Cosmo Baker, Illvibe Collective, Scratch Academy + more.


This is an Open Source event! For more information on our citywide public art exhibition and 40+ events in October, visit opensource.muralarts.org.

As the block party closes down, make sure you stroll down the block to Franky Bradley’s (1320 Chancellor St.) as Heineken presents OBEY THE DJ. Ugly Bass brothers Mr. Sonny James & DJ Royale will guide a musical journey bumping everything from Soulful Rhythms to Classic Party Bangers. No need for requests (or to pay cover before 11pm) just OBEY THE DJ and get your groove on!


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215mag 90’s R&B Fresh Fest Ticket Giveaway

ENTER BELOW:

Calling all who want to rekindle that love and passion… it’s time to get your smooth on! two.one.five magazine is giving two winners each a pair of tickets for 90’s R&B Fresh Fest at The Liacouras Center in Temple University for this Sunday October 11th, 2015.


Lineup includes the acts of Bell Biv Devoe, Brian McKnight, Guy, Chante Moore & Michel’le.


Winners (chosen randomly) will be notified via email Sunday October 11th (day of show) by NOON. Submit your first and last name and email by October 11th at 11:00am ET for your chance to win.

(Printed tickets available for pick-up, winner will receive details)


For more exclusive coverage, ticket giveaways, features, and live updates follow @215mag on twitter, and Instagram.

Third Annual Roots, Rock, Run, GrassROOTS Community Foundation Raises $6k

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THIRD ANNUAL ROOTS, ROCK, RUN 5K RETURNED TO GERMANTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD IN PHILADELPHIA TO PROMOTE HEALTHY LIFESTYLES IN URBAN DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES

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Tariq “Black Thought” Trotter, The GrassROOTS Community Foundation (GCF), members of The Roots band, and hundreds of Philadelphians took to the streets of Germantown on May 30th for the 3rd Annual Roots, Rock, Run (R3) 5k community walk/run.

“We are running, walking, and talking in Germantown to show our support for healthy girls and healthy communities,” declares Trotter, co-founder and MC of the, The Roots.

Fourteen year-old Crystal Ortiz (pictured above), was this year’s winner finishing the route in 18:25. She was one of hundreds of runners and walkers that helped raise nearly $6,000. Proceeds from the race went to support GrassROOTS afterschool health programs for youth at Anna L. Lingelbach Elementary School. Primary support for R3 comes from Jimmy Jazz stores, who gifted 100 pair of Adidas sneakers and Reebok who donated 100 pairs to participating youth. Additional key support came form State Legislature Stephen Kinsey, Councilwoman Cindy Bass, State Senator Art Haywood, the Philadelphia Police Department and SEPTA.


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R3 is a GrassROOTS engagement activity that raises awareness of the importance of physical activity and healthier living and seeks to reclaim impoverished neighborhood spaces. This year’s event took place once again at Lingelbach Elementary, site of the new GrassROOTS’ afterschool program for girls, funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

GrassROOTS chose to remain at Lingelbach because of the economic and social challenges facing the community. More than a quarter of the residents in the targeted neighborhood live in poverty, and the income per capita is 15 percent less than the rest of Philadelphia. Equally important was the fact that Lingelbach was only awarded $160.00 for their discretionary funding for the entire school year.

City Councilwoman Cindy Bass, State Rep Steve Kinsey, State Sen Art Haywood and Aja Graydon of Kindred the Family Soul were all in attendance, along with runners from Black Girls Run, the Black Running Organization, Black Men Run and even the principal of Lingelbach. R&B groups Mprynt and Good Girl both performed.


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The day also featured other acts of service and activities, including face-painting and surprise musical performances. And as tradition dictates, R3 hosted its dance contest. The Lingelbach Home and School Association was also collecting summer reading books and toys that encourage outdoor activity.



For more information on GrassROOTS and R3, visit:
–> www.grassrootscommunityfoundation.org
–> @grassrootsfound

Story/Photos via Skai Blue Media

Upcoming: 40th Annual Odunde Festival – Sunday June 14th

40th Annual Odunde Festival

When: Sunday, June 14, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Where: 23rd & South Streets
Cost: FREE
For info: Click here for full festival details.

::::: via Philly360 ::::::::

Philly, It’s time to celebrate the African New Year and our city’s rich culture and heritage with the 40th Annual Odunde Festival.  Meaning “ Happy New Year” in Yoruba, Odunde was created in the likeness of African celebrations of the Yoruba people in Nigeria.

Held every second Sunday in June since 1975, this massive event brings South Street West to life, drawing thousands of visitors from around the country to shop its African marketplace, take in lively performances, and enjoy all of the other Odunde festivities.

Each year, the festival begins with a group procession from South 23rd and South Streets to the Schuylkill River to make offerings to Oshun, the Yoruba goddess of the river. Then the crowd returns to 23rd and South for the official start of the festival, which stretches over twelve city blocks. In the African marketplace, vendors from around the globe offer great food, art, clothing, jewelry, and other black and African-influenced wares.

In addition to great shopping and eats, Odunde features two stages that will explode with some of Philly and the country’s most entertaining performers. Be on the look out for great R&B, soul and gospel music, African dancing and Odunde’s signature drum circle.

This year’s performance highlights include Philadanco, Rennie Harris, Philly Youth Poetry Movement and a special throwback hip-hop concert feaeturing Kurt Blow, Special Ed, Chubb Rock and Kwame.

Click here to get the full deets on this year’s Odunde festival.

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Odunde

#HEINEKENGREENROOM ft PEEDI CRAKK: Photo RECAP

Last Friday night kicked off real nicely at Pub Webb on Cecil B Moore Ave — with DJ Ayeboogie spinning from up in the rafters. The room filled up early on in anticipation of North Philly’s own Peedi Crakk representing live on stage with the “Who Got The Jazz Band.”

Peedi immediately showed love and appreciation to the crowd saying how grateful he was to have had everyone’s support dating back to when he first smashed onto the Roc-A-Fella scene with State Property. His talented rhymes and wordplay were accented by his many fans shouting out lyrics and raising all of those green bottles in the air to the verses.

A treat wrapped up the night when Freeway came to the stage to debut a new track from his upcoming album exclusive and live for the Heineken Green Room crowd.

Needless to say, it was the place to be — don’t just take our word for it (And don’t fret if you missed it cuz #HeinekenGreenRoom has another big night coming up in June, so stay tuned!):



Photo creditsYSKSK Media | @YSKSKMedia



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Let’s Move It Philly: Black Thought and Hometown Heroes Party with Purpose

Story by Franceska Rouzard


Many in the region may remember Saturday, February 21st as the night of a wicked wintry storm. However, the funkiest and flyest of Philadelphia will remember it as the night they shared a dance floor with brilliant activists like Dr. Janice Johnson Dias, and talented artists and pioneers the likes of Philadelphia’s own Tariq “Black Thought” Trotter, DJ Jazzy Jeff and Rich Medina [yea we’re claiming you too Rich!].


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Hosted by the GrassROOTS Community Foundation, an organization co-founded by long time friends Black Thought and Dr. Johnson Dias, The 5th Annual Let’s Move It: Philly aimed to raise money for Linglebach Elementary [learn how you can help #SaveLingelbach], one of many educational institutions in Philadelphia who received laughable, in a not so funny kind of way, discretionary funding for this school year. Held at Trilogy [formerly Palmer Social Club], attendees described it simply as, “a good time for a good cause.”

Many who braved the weather and ventured to the event, from near and far, expressed openly they were “glad they came out!”


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Personally I, as a Philly transplant, was in awe of the entire evening. It is difficult to pinpoint a sole source of wonderment. It could have been the overwhelming turn out given the weather. Perhaps, it was bankhead bouncing to Busta Rhymes with an accomplished, well dressed sociology professor. Conceivably, it was the easy-going nature of Grammy-Award winning, world-renowned artists mingling with guests just like all the others.

No doubt it was the DJ sets and live performance from Black Thought, which so well complimented the energy of the evening – originating with the cause(s) the GrassROOTS Community Foundation stand for.


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I was afforded the privilege of speaking with Dr. Johnson Dias, Rich Medina, and Black Thought about the GrassROOTS Community Foundation, the Linglebach Elementary cause, and future plans for Philadelphia.



FR: On the home page of the GrassROOTS Community Foundation’s website, there is a big banner that says “A Tribute to Tanji Dewberry”. Who is that?

Dr. Johnson Dias: Tanji Dewberry is a friend, author, mentor and a trailblazer in ‘Super Camp‘, a summer day camp for Philadelphia’s inner city girls. Her dream was to extend it to Philadelphian boys. She died in a fire trying to rescue her children. Last year, her mother, Cynthia Mitchell, funded three boys to Super Camp.

FR: What does it take to put an event like this together?

Black Thought: It takes a lot of planning and flexibility and the delegation of many responsibilities. It takes a strong and reliable team, people you can trust and who can improvise. It takes a village.

FR: I read the GrassROOTS Community Foundation has a three year commitment to Linglebach Elementary to create an after school program. What are the next steps?

Black Thought: After tonight, we plan to give a nice sized contribution. Our next fundraiser is a 5k race called Roots Rock Run.

FR: Dr. Johnson Dias and Black Thought have decided to take their success and help the city of Philly, and others. What motivates you, Rich?

Rich Medina: I have a son, a 7 year old. Also, I went to college so I know the importance of education and learning. However, I feel I learned even more during college in my extracurricular activities — outside of the classroom. For that reason, I remain a student even now. I believe in a lifetime of learning and promoting wellness and forward thinking.


More info about the GrassROOTS Community Foundation

Website | Twitter | Facebook


 Photos courtesy of Saeed Briscoe

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