Category Archives: Art & Culture

Third Annual Roots, Rock, Run, GrassROOTS Community Foundation Raises $6k

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THIRD ANNUAL ROOTS, ROCK, RUN 5K RETURNED TO GERMANTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD IN PHILADELPHIA TO PROMOTE HEALTHY LIFESTYLES IN URBAN DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES

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Tariq “Black Thought” Trotter, The GrassROOTS Community Foundation (GCF), members of The Roots band, and hundreds of Philadelphians took to the streets of Germantown on May 30th for the 3rd Annual Roots, Rock, Run (R3) 5k community walk/run.

“We are running, walking, and talking in Germantown to show our support for healthy girls and healthy communities,” declares Trotter, co-founder and MC of the, The Roots.

Fourteen year-old Crystal Ortiz (pictured above), was this year’s winner finishing the route in 18:25. She was one of hundreds of runners and walkers that helped raise nearly $6,000. Proceeds from the race went to support GrassROOTS afterschool health programs for youth at Anna L. Lingelbach Elementary School. Primary support for R3 comes from Jimmy Jazz stores, who gifted 100 pair of Adidas sneakers and Reebok who donated 100 pairs to participating youth. Additional key support came form State Legislature Stephen Kinsey, Councilwoman Cindy Bass, State Senator Art Haywood, the Philadelphia Police Department and SEPTA.


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R3 is a GrassROOTS engagement activity that raises awareness of the importance of physical activity and healthier living and seeks to reclaim impoverished neighborhood spaces. This year’s event took place once again at Lingelbach Elementary, site of the new GrassROOTS’ afterschool program for girls, funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

GrassROOTS chose to remain at Lingelbach because of the economic and social challenges facing the community. More than a quarter of the residents in the targeted neighborhood live in poverty, and the income per capita is 15 percent less than the rest of Philadelphia. Equally important was the fact that Lingelbach was only awarded $160.00 for their discretionary funding for the entire school year.

City Councilwoman Cindy Bass, State Rep Steve Kinsey, State Sen Art Haywood and Aja Graydon of Kindred the Family Soul were all in attendance, along with runners from Black Girls Run, the Black Running Organization, Black Men Run and even the principal of Lingelbach. R&B groups Mprynt and Good Girl both performed.


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The day also featured other acts of service and activities, including face-painting and surprise musical performances. And as tradition dictates, R3 hosted its dance contest. The Lingelbach Home and School Association was also collecting summer reading books and toys that encourage outdoor activity.



For more information on GrassROOTS and R3, visit:
–> www.grassrootscommunityfoundation.org
–> @grassrootsfound

Story/Photos via Skai Blue Media

Upcoming: 40th Annual Odunde Festival – Sunday June 14th

40th Annual Odunde Festival

When: Sunday, June 14, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Where: 23rd & South Streets
Cost: FREE
For info: Click here for full festival details.

::::: via Philly360 ::::::::

Philly, It’s time to celebrate the African New Year and our city’s rich culture and heritage with the 40th Annual Odunde Festival.  Meaning “ Happy New Year” in Yoruba, Odunde was created in the likeness of African celebrations of the Yoruba people in Nigeria.

Held every second Sunday in June since 1975, this massive event brings South Street West to life, drawing thousands of visitors from around the country to shop its African marketplace, take in lively performances, and enjoy all of the other Odunde festivities.

Each year, the festival begins with a group procession from South 23rd and South Streets to the Schuylkill River to make offerings to Oshun, the Yoruba goddess of the river. Then the crowd returns to 23rd and South for the official start of the festival, which stretches over twelve city blocks. In the African marketplace, vendors from around the globe offer great food, art, clothing, jewelry, and other black and African-influenced wares.

In addition to great shopping and eats, Odunde features two stages that will explode with some of Philly and the country’s most entertaining performers. Be on the look out for great R&B, soul and gospel music, African dancing and Odunde’s signature drum circle.

This year’s performance highlights include Philadanco, Rennie Harris, Philly Youth Poetry Movement and a special throwback hip-hop concert feaeturing Kurt Blow, Special Ed, Chubb Rock and Kwame.

Click here to get the full deets on this year’s Odunde festival.

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Odunde

The Pikolinos Maasai Project: 215 Feature

Do you believe ‘The world is at your fingertips’ ?? This belief may be showing its truth more and more every day. Your ability to reach the world through travel and the internet has afforded many opportunities that many would never image. The individual from a small rural part of the world now has the ability to touch those in large cities like New York and Tokyo. Which brings us to an unlikely pairing on paper but in today’s ever changing market, more common than not. How does a leather goods company from Spain connect with a Maasai Chief from Kenya? This is where opportunity and preparation meet.

Pikolinos is a Spanish shoe brand that forms part of the Pikolinos Group, a company whose activities range from tanning leather to having their own shops. Their story…


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From: maasai.pikolinos.com

Maasai Tribal Chief Kikanae Ole Pere, or William as he is known in the West, is a Maasai warrior who was declared leader of his community in Kenya after his unwavering efforts to provide for his tribe. William crossed paths with the President of the NGA ADCAM Rosa Escandell and together started a long journey to raise awareness in the Maasai community to inspire them to build for a better future via their own economic resources outside of tourism. Together they created The Maasai Project.

Maasai Project is a design collaboration program with Pikolinos and the Maasai Mara in Kenya and Tanzania where the profits are given back to the Maasai women involved to provide hope and opportunity for a sustainable future through building their own economic resources while empowering women with greater rights and employment.

I had the honor to meet and speak with William at Benjamin Lovell Shoes in Center City.


— Guest contributor: Olumide Yerokun —



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Olumide: How did the collaboration start between yourself and Pikolinos?

William: This all started from a dream I had that one day I’d be able build my own business, travel, and positively affect the people in my community. I was lucky to meet the owners of Pikolinos and present them my ideas and we were able to create the Maasai Project.

How has this project helped the women of the Maasai Tribe?

The project has allowed women to be self-sustaining in an environment that does not always foster a woman’s independence. Through the Maasai Project it was taught women entrepreneurship and allowed them to make wages for themselves feed their families and send their children to school.

Are there any plans or hopes to expand into other fashion areas?

Yes, working with Pikolinos has given us a great opportunity to see how well the woman’s designs are for shoes and since Pikolinos works with leather goods we would love for the women to design more. With this current project the women have been able to create bracelets and necklaces that are great accessories with the shoes.


Photo: maasai.pikolinos.com
Photo: maasai.pikolinos.com

Do you think this will inspire the youth to pursue more projects that allow them to affect their community and the world?

Yes, this was a part of my dream. I wanted my people to be able to have more opportunities to grow and learn. We’ve been able to create programs that help educate children. Through this we hope to expose children to more opportunities and have an interest in what they can do for their community and the world.

How do you think your leadership has changed the tribe for the better?

My leadership has opened the eyes of the community and how we view women. Before women were not as valued as they should be. Entrepreneurship has really allowed women to go above and beyond the Maasai Project and shown the strength and ingenuity of our women.

Do you have a favorite design?

Yes I have a favorite. They are all my favorite (laughs)!



For more info visit:
Pikolinos website – http://www.pikolinos.com/
Maasai Project website – http://maasai.pikolinos.com/

 

Help vote THE BLUE AND GOLD CLUB into “The Tournament”

Support a local team of Drexel-alum as they will compete for $1million cash prize against teams across the nation. Northeast Region games will be played in Philly July 17, 18, 19. See details below. MUST vote by June 1st.


CLICK HERE TO VOTE FOR THE BLUE AND GOLD CLUB


Instructions: Click link above and set up account. Leave team name BLANK as the link auto votes for them. OR search for “The Blue and Gold Club” in the North East Region after you register if you have any problems.


A quote for team organizer Rob Falcone:

“Even if we aren’t officially a part of the Big 5, we’re still a part of the fabric Philadelphia basketball. This is an opportunity to put some of the best whoever played at Drexel and to go and win a couple of games and say we really do care about basketball and that extends beyond the NCAA.”


Meet the Blue and Gold Club:

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MORE info below and visit official “The Tournament” website HERE.

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Hiatus Kaiyote Exclusive Interview: Kaiyote Beautiful

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Striving as we music lovers do for a new sound that appeals to our palette, it’s not often we come across something that grabs our shortening attention spans… let alone envelops us the further we dig in. That is the bliss — free from ignorance — we hungrily look to feed upon.

When one finds Hiatus Kaiyote it may take a while to realize what is being heard. That wonder is the fuel for interest in wanting to feel and know more. Just as this Melbourne based quartet of musicians challenge themselves (and each other) in creating / performing their music, they invite others into the experience while lending time and space to learn and grow. Accept their invitation and enjoy raw appreciation for the delicately layered and well thought up lyrics which flow over an ensemble of sounds, forming Hiatus’ brand new album, “Choose Your Weapon” (Released May 4, 2015).

That’s when you’ll witness a soaking up of styles from decades past, expressed en vogue — that create an electrically current, even futuristic sound — pushing lyrical limits in an effort to understand our soulful experience in super/natural surroundings. The beauty — and the beast (that ever-present grit and funk), lies in the orchestrated push and pull of different arrangements and interludes that lead singer, songwriter, and guitarist Nai Palm fearlessly leads you through.

The album title implores you to make a wise choice, thinking ahead. A key ingredient to any act is the act-ivating. From there the belief that possibilities are endless guides a freeing of the mind — and we know what follows in time.

Below: I talked with Hiatus Kaiyote drummer Perrin Moss about their new album, the dynamic music culture of Melbourne, and more.



Philly! Check out Hiatus Kaiyote this month:
–> Friday May 8th @ Underground Arts ( Tickets )
** w/ Kate Faust and Mr. Sonny James

–> Saturday May 30th @ The Roots Picnic ( Tickets )



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Aran Hart: What do you think makes Hiatus Kaiyote and its music unique?

Perrin Moss: It’s 4 people that are very strong minded in their opinions. There’s not one person taking charge and telling everyone else what to do. Everyone brings in their own ideas. Even if it is a song that our lead singer Nai has written, we all interject and put in our own stamp on our parts. Then we workshop the fuck out of it to put it together. The input is so broad, not ever sticking too much to one thing.

We’re always challenging ourselves and the listener, but also keeping the music accessible, not going too far overboard. Even if individuals have their own point of reference for a tune, guiding the song in one direction — we’ll pick up on that vibe but not do it so obviously.

I come from a production background so I’m always thinking about how it would sound on the record. So as the drummer, with a drum fill or whatever, I’m like “Alright cool, I might sit back in the pocket a bit on this part because if I was on the record the drums wouldn’t be all in your face.” So we feel it out that way and I guess it expresses our uniqueness.

Is there a tempo or type of syncopation your band consciously creates? In particular your arrangements/pauses seem to be very complex and a trademark if you will…

I feel like that’s just what we do and maybe over time it’s become a conscious thing. I used to listen to a lot of this ‘South Asian’ music and now when I hear myself drum I can hear where it’s coming from in that sense — the spacing and phrasing. Once you start playing rhythms over and over again it starts coming out in your subconscious. Now when I hear a straight groove that is completely on time, it doesn’t seem natural to me as a drummer — for what I would play.

My natural thing is to be loose and have a few limbs hit later than the other ones, it’s ingrained in me. I keep getting influenced by other music and players, and influenced by life. So that really constantly redevelops your sound. So those time-signature changes is something now, if it wasn’t in the beginning, very natural to us. We don’t want to be known as a certain signature complex style though… or caught up trying to be any one thing, you know. We also really appreciate the simple forms and styles of music. It’s part of the process of us growing as musicians with our instruments.

You think about a lot of people who start off playing music and they wanna shred and then when they get older they chill out on that and want to hear the space in music. So I feel like we’re on our way with that, while not forgetting the feeling you first have when we started playing music — that excitement.

In the beginning it was really fucking hard to play our songs and all the ideas we came up with. But that’s why we liked it and why we came up with it. It was us developing another skill set on our instruments. Saying, “Hmm, I never felt this before… how all of us are playing this way and linking up with each other in new ways — and thinking, “hey this sounds alright!”


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Were these recording sessions long (in a good way) with a lot of improv… in essence how structured was the recording process? Because the records sound so natural and blended, while intricate and outside the box…

Our recording sessions were very structured. We tend to write a song and play it in loops for quite some time until we play it live (in concert) and then it will change from there. So we have a lot of experience with the songs before actually recording them. And then when it comes to the studio, most of the songs end up being the same length and form, pretty much. Sometimes what we play changes to achieve the sound we’re looking for, and how we want it to be perceived.

One song on the record “Swamp Thing,” we didn’t really have a form properly and we made it up in the studio as we went. That was the most free-moving kind of song that we recorded. We did three versions and did three different outros with a lot of improvisation. When we figured out the mixing of the album, and the structure of the song, the first half was pretty much how we worked out in the studio… While the last part we listened to all 3 takes and put a little bit of this outro, and a little of that one together from what we liked of each. Then we get into overdub land, so yea it gets pretty deep [laughs].

But, we’re not the type of band that just goes into the studio and starts writing songs and record them at the same time. We definitely marinate on the songs for a long time and figure out what feels right by playing them with each other and live at shows to see how people react to them.

What pieces/elements do you need to start/create a song?

It changes every time but I feel like we all like a story within a song. So lyrics have a lot to do with that and are very important. We feel it’s never a full song until there are lyrics involved. We love having that narrative. Also, I’m a drummer and it’s funny because I don’t feel like I can play any beat until I hear some chords. Even if I just hear 3 chords it gives me an emotional connection to feed off. It’s all about an emotional connection first and then whatever feels right in that context. A lot of the time we love to have these dreamy starts and ends, that draw the listener in and then things develop from there.

It’s always important to mix it up. Sometimes the songs will come from a production track I’ve done, then we’ll rework it. Other times Bender will come up with a guitar melody and Nai will write over top of that. Other times Nai will have a whole song — and you could say this was kind of “the birth” of Hiatus: Nai’s material, just acoustic guitar and vocals, with no other elements involved. I don’t know if she was thinking about a band or other elements, more just writing a beautiful song at the time. And then we developed the other elements around that emotion or feeling.

Of course, at times it’s just whatever we’re feeling. Maybe we wanna create this nasty, gritty, weird 60’s hip-hop thing that’s never been heard before, because hip-hop wasn’t around back then but it sounds like it was made in the 60’s. So then you have this weird crossover between this contemporary world and the old school way of making records. We’re always thinking about that kind of stuff.


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Talk about this new album…How did you know this was an album?What makes this collection an album?

A lot of it has to do with the time period. Also, that feeling of, “if we don’t record this song now, we might never record it…” Or we’ve been playing a song live for a while — and maybe it wasn’t quite ready when we did the first album. So, “if we don’t put it in this record, when will it come out?” We put everything in that people had heard, and that was already enough material to not really have to add in anything that new — though we have added a couple new ones too. It’s a documentation of our music and a time period. Capturing those moments and songs on this record.

And the next record will be a totally different thing, that will probably start from now. It will start when we’re on the road because we’ll come up with some random shit in soundcheck that will start developing. Then in a year’s time that will turn into a new song on a new record, just like how much the stuff on this record started before. We’re not very good at keeping secrets with our songs. We like to try them out and see how people react to them, and then we can go and record them.


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Describe something that happened to the band in the last 6 months/year and how it has played out for better or worse…

We always really wanted to work with Miguel Atwood-Ferguson — who did the Suite For Ma Dukes thing: a whole bunch of J Dilla songs that he interpreted with like a 30-piece orchestra. We were all just so amazed when we heard that in Australia.

We all love hip-hop and J Dilla, especially me, and didn’t even know for a long time that a lot of my favorite hip-hop songs were produced by Dilla. I was always after this certain characteristic or sound and then I realized that a lot of the songs were in fact done by the same person.

So, during an interview one day we were asked who in the world we wanted to work with and we all said “Miguel Atwood-Ferguson.” And thank god we got to work with him on this record. One of our only features outside of Australia, who among musicians is a big superstar. He jumped on a track of ours called “The Lung.” It was really beautiful and special for us to work with someone of that high caliber.

Also, collaborating with other musicians in Melbourne as well has allowed us to steer away from always ‘over-laying’ parts over parts for songs. We have been able to sit around in a room together with a couple mics, and do one take we could incorporate into a part of a song. This new process is something that has transformed how we are writing and recording our music and where we want to continue going as a band.

Describe the music culture in Melbourne?

It’s a very multicultural city with a lot of opportunities to see music. It’s also a small city so you get to meet a lot of people in the music community when you go to gigs. A lot of people there delve into a lot of different genres. There’s not a lot of ego there or fighting among musicians for gigs. More of a friendly competitiveness where people are giving each other support. The crew of people that I hang out with are a lot of my favorite musicians in the world and I connect with them so much. It’s not just Hiatus — I feel we could all play in each other’s bands because we come from the same place. I don’t know what is happening there but a lot of people are in the same head space about music and about pushing things — but still being true to yourself. It’s a very supportive network.

How as a band do you define progress/positive growth?

We just really take each day as it comes. Our goal is to become better musicians by continuing to push ourselves, and each other. But I guess we’ll never know if we do become great because it seems no musicians really ever feel like they’re great…ya know? And that’s the main part of what keeps pushing you forward and growing.




For more from Hiatus Kaiyote:
Website | @HiatusKaiyote | Youtube

Hiatus Kaiyote coming LIVE to Philly:

THIS Friday May 8th @ Underground Arts ( Tickets )
–> w/ Kate Faust and Mr. Sonny James

Saturday May 30th @ The Roots Picnic ( Tickets )

215 Feature: Ghana to Philly… STEMbees creating a buzz

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Story by Olumide Yerokun and Aran Hart. 

We can’t deny the impact that mobile technology continues to have on how the world dynamically interacts. Our society is increasingly attached to our devices, plus we’re starting to wear more of it, and undoubtedly the impact has real effects. Not only does technology keep us connected to loved ones and drive business, it advances our understanding of the world around us — For example, collecting soil moisture levels, gathering, transmitting, and analyzing critical data as we strive to make improvements to vital industries such as agriculture to help feed a fast growing international population.

As women’s history month comes to an end we remember the past, and look to the future of women’s contributions to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields. Examples like Emmy Noether and her contributions to mathematics are certainly worthy of our praise as we consider who overcame obstacles to succeed in STEM.

Now, we consider the always interesting question for each new generation: How will the young women of today take the spark made by Noether (and others) and pave new paths?


We sat down with Linda Ansong, Nana Essuman and Dr. Jamie Bracey of STEMbees. STEMbees is a non-profit based in Accra, Ghana focused on encouraging and mentoring more young African women to pursue their dreams and careers in STEM.


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Beyond STEMbees, Ms. Ansong is also Co- Founder of Vestracker AB, Dr. Bracey is Founder of Creative Tech Works Design Studio (CTW) in Philadelphia, and Mr. Essuman is the lead mentor at CTW who is now guiding the replication of CTW Design Studio in Ghana .

We discussed the upcoming City Streets Race during Philly Tech Week 2015, their experiences in STEM, influences, and the significance of striving for more involvement of women in the tech world.



Olumide Yerokun: How was STEMbees Started?

Linda Ansong: In undergrad I studied actuarial science which is very math focused. After college I found myself in an institution called Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology for two years. A majority of my classes were male dominated and I saw this as a problem. I wanted to do something that would motivate and empower more young women to venture into STEM industries. Once I was able to tell Nana about my idea he introduced me to Dr. Bracey and we went from there.


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Linda Ansong and STEMbees participants in Ghana (via Facebook)

OY: What is the goal of STEMbees and Creative Tech Works?

Nana Essuman: Both organizations have similar goals. The main focus is developing youth to build tech products that create stability and enrich their local communities. Creative Tech Works just happens to focus on youth as a whole and STEMbees focuses on young women. So through this we are able to take what Creative Tech Works has created with City Streets and work on transferring that model to Accra, Ghana. The first pilot is in December ’15, in Ghana, so we are working toward making it a great event for the youth.

OY: What is the inspiration behind the City Streets Race?

Dr. Bracey: We have a culture that likes to play games whether it is on the phone, a board game, or in real life. The goal was to figure out how to get people, specifically young people, to appreciate where they live and interact with technology at the same time.

We had the young people in the program write the code for the mobile app that will be used in the race. We then created a game around the race and we get the young people to engage with cultural icons in the city. It really stems from civil engagement where participants in the race are engaging and learning more about their city.

OY: What unique advantage do women bring to STEM industries?

Linda Ansong: Women are strong, critical, and systematic which is needed in the process of building technology. Having women on our team is the best thing that can happen because women have patience and an ability to bridge the gap in a lot of work environments.

Being outnumbered in most classes 10 to 1 gave me a unique perspective of where women can excel. It wasn’t that women couldn’t do the work it’s just that women needed to be motivated to pursue further education in STEM, past secondary school and through college.

OY: How did your culture influence you growing up?

Linda Ansong: Growing up I was the girl that wanted to know how this or that happened. I would watch Sci-Fi movies and be amazed by what was going on. I really enjoyed math and took a software development class in college that sparked my interest in tech. Both my parents are entrepreneurs which really influenced me, especially my mother. They gave me the strength to work toward my own dreams. Being from Ghana and having the ability to travel opened my eyes to a lot and gave me a new perspective on the opportunities of traveling. My mother told me I can either go travel just to shop or I can go travel learn a lot and create bigger opportunities for myself.

OY: What is the hope for women in STEM?

Dr. Bracey: The goal is for women to go from consumers to producers. To understand the value of technology, you don’t have to be an entrepreneur but at least understand the process of how the technology that you are using works. It’s developing women to be strategic and tactical at the same time.

Linda Ansong: My hope is to help young girls understand that it’s more than just understanding software or programming. I want young girls to understand that there is a large opportunity to create jobs, sustainability, and wealth for their community. It’s tough but it’s an amazing journey and experience to go from working for someone else to working for yourself. It’s powerful knowing that I’m helping show more young girls that they can do it as well.


For more information visit:

STEMbees.orgCityStreets RaceCreativeTechworks.org

City Streets: Race Through History – The 1st Youth-Designed Technology Race in Philly

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For City Streets: Philadelphia, local students will produce apps & wearable tech to race across the city during Philly Tech Week 2015.


 Tweet about race using hashtag: #CityStreetsPTW15 and #PTW15


Teams of two will wear engineered tracking devices and use a coded app to race to historic “freedom” landmarks across Philadelphia on April 25th. (exact route is a SECRET – appx 4 miles long you uncover and follow with clues like Amazing Race).

Special prizes will be awarded to the winners during the post-race celebration at Pipeline Philly, The Graham Building, 30 S 15th St, 15th floor.

1st place – Samsung Chromebook
2nd place – Kindle Fire
3rd place – Skullcandy earphones

REGISTER FOR THE RACE HERE
** 50% off Early Bird – 2-person Team – before April 15th

Details: For more information please visit: Creativetechworks.org

– Start Time: Participants MUST arrive by 8:15am sharp (Guests/Family 8:30am)

– Start Location: 15th and Cecil B. Moore Ave
(Rear of Beech Interplex Parking Lot)

City Streets™ Race Proceeds
All race proceeds will be fully tax deductible and benefit continuation of the Creative Tech Works Design Studio™ , hosted by Beech Community Services. To make donations, please send checks to CTWDS @ Beech, c/o Beech Community Services, 1510 Cecil B. Moore Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19121.



The event is endorsed by the City of Philadelphia and AT&T is a presenting sponsor

Creative Tech Works ( @CTWGroup )– founders of City Streets Race, provide students ages 14-21 with a “cognitive apprenticeship” immersion in technology and micro-engineering design teams.

Tonight and Tomorrow: Dice Raw of The Roots presents The Last Jimmy

“The Last Jimmy” is a poignant and relevant stage play that explores mass incarceration and outlines the ills of the criminal justice system and prison industrial complex.

Told though a hip-hop musical odyssey featuring song, live music and dance, this production takes us down the plight of the court and prison system though the experience of young black males.

“The Last Jimmy” is inspired by Dr. Michelle Alexander’s book, The New Jim Crow.

The performance features original music and lyrics by Dice Raw along with original choreography by Renee Harris; is directed by noted Philadelphia- based director, Ozzie Jones and written by Phillip S. Brown.

Buy Tickets Here

SHOW DATES @ The Prince Music Theater ( 1412 Chestnut St. )
Fri 3/20
Sat 3/21

Buy Tickets Here

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Fri 13th: CMTA and The Wrkn Clss Present Lil Feece (Sashi)

On March 13th Creative Minds Think Alike, in conjunction with The Wrkn Clss, a full service production group, will be presenting hip-hop artist Lil Feece, (Sashi), to the Philadelphia region with the release of his upcoming EP, “SASHI SZN”. The celebration will be held at Cohesive Collection, 1215 Vine St from 10pm to 2am.

We will be presenting the event as a celebration rather than a release party in order to familiarize the guest with Sashi.  We will have a visual arts element that will be present at the event; the visual art element has a long-term strategy that will not be implemented until the event has passed.

DJ’s Ryan Mahoney and DJ F1lthy will curate the sounds of the evening. DJ Ryan Mahoney is native to Atlantic City and an emerging DJ on both colleges in Philadelphia as well as the alternative scene that is developing here in Philadelphia. DJ Ryan Mahoney built his experience by spinning in a number of clubs in the tri-state area and having the number one online campus radio-station on iHeart radio, Philly Rap Fix. DJ F1lthy has been making a lot of noise in the tri-state area as well, with his expertise being in music production as well as on the turntables. DJ F1lthy is a force to be recognized that shows no signs of letting up.

Hosting the event will be the captivating Franceleslia, recognized for the way she electrifies her crowd, her presence and technique is in demand across the nation. Franceleslia has created a massive hosting movement in which she graced over 20 stages in less than a year. Her repertoire includes AFROPUNK, Camron’s SUPERBOWL Party at WIP, Danny Brown’s Album Release Party and Trillectro festival just to name a few.

Being as though Creative Minds Think Alike is an emerging brand, we feel that it is our duty to present the opportunity for underground artist to display their craftsmanship.  We have partnered with Lil Feece in the past with the most recent project being Gravy Trap. On behalf of Creative Minds Think Alike, we formally invite you to partake in the celebration as well as grow and build with an array of guest and hosts that are becoming familiar and essential to the metropolitan area, Philadelphia.

HipHopSince1987.com Feature

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